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Den Haag, by Georg Braun & Frans Hogenberg.

Braun G. & Hogenberg F. and the Civitates Orbis Terrarum.

The Civitates Orbis Terrarum, or the "Braun & Hogenberg", is a six-volume town atlas and the greatest book of town views and plans ever published: 363 engravings, sometimes beautifully coloured. It was one of the best-selling works in the last quarter of the 16th century. Georg Braun wrote the text accompanying the plans and views on the verso. A large number of the plates were engraved after the original drawings of Joris Hoefnagel (1542-1600), who was a professional artist. The first volume was published in Latin in 1572, the sixth volume in 1617. Frans Hogenberg created the tables for volumes I through IV, and Simon van den Neuwel created those for volumes V and VI. Other contributors were cartographer Daniel Freese, and Heinrich Rantzau. Works by Jacob van Deventer, Sebastian Münster, and Johannes Stumpf were also used. Translations appeared in German and French.

Following the original publication of Volume 1 of the Civitates in 1572, seven further editions of 1575, 1577, 1582, 1588, 1593, 1599 and 1612 can be identified. Vol.2, first issued in 1575, was followed by further editions in 1597 and in 1612. The next volumes appeared in 1581, 1588, 1593, 1599 and 1606. The German translation of the first volume appeared from 1574 on and the French edition from 1575 on.

Several printers were involved: Theodor Graminaeus, Heinrich von Aich, Gottfried von Kempen, Johannis Sinniger, Bertram Buchholtz and Peter von Brachel, who all worked in Cologne.

Georg Braun (1541-1622)

Georg Braun was born in Cologne in 1541. After his studies in Cologne he entered the Jesuit Order as a novice. In 1561 he obtained his bachelor's degree and in 1562 his Magister Artium. Although he left the Jesuit Order, he studied theology, gaining a licentiate in theology.

Frans Hogenberg (1535-1590)

Frans Hogenberg was a Flemish and German painter, engraver, and mapmaker. He was born in Mechelen as the son of Nicolaas Hogenberg.

By the end of the 1560s Frans Hogenberg was employed upon Abraham Ortelius's Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, published in 1570; he is named as engraver on numerous maps. In 1568 he was bannend from Antwerp by the Duke of Alva and travelled to London, where he stayed a few years before emigrating to Cologne. There he immediately embarked on his two most important works, the Civitates published from 1572 and the Geschichtsblätter, which appeared in several series from 1569 until about 1587.

Thanks to such large scale projects as the Geschichtsblätter and the Civitates, Hogenberg's social circumstances improved with each passing year. He died as a wealthy man in Cologne in 1590.

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Hagae Comitis celeberrimi totius Europae municipij typus. - Georg Braun & Frans Hogenberg, 1618.

€900  ($1053 / £810)
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Item Number:  26785
Category:  Antique maps > Europe > Netherlands - Cities
References: Van der Krogt 4 - #1033; Fauser - #4914; Taschen, Br. Hog. - p.447

Old, antique map - bird's-eye view plan of the Hague by Georg Braun and Frans Hogenberg.

Oud stadsplan in vogelperspectief van Den Haag, door Georg Braun and Frans Hogenberg.

With an 18-item key to locations.

CARTOUCHE: Impression of the Hague, a city famous in all Europe.

COMMENTARY BY BRAUN: "The residence of the counts, called the court, is very well known, and is surrounded by poor walls and ditches. It is said to have been built by Count William, who was also the Roman king. As far as the village itself is concerned, it is as big as a medium-sized town, and, like other towns, has paved streets with houses standing very close together."

The bird's-eye view plan from the southwest shows an impressive unfortified residential city, traversed by canals, with densely packed and often very uniform town houses. Standing out clearly in the plan is the curious late Gothic Sint-Jacobskerk (4). On the right immediately next to it is the Renaissance town hall (3) and below the court pond is the palace (1) with its big, rectangular inner courtyard and the Knights' Hall (Ridderzaal). Originally there was a hunting lodge here, which was extended to a seat of government by Counts William II and Floris V of Holland in the 13th century. Today the city has a population of around 475,000 and is the royal residence and seat of the Dutch government and Parliament, as well as a number of international institutions such as the International Court of Justice. (Taschen)

Date of the first edition: 1617
Date of this map: 1618

Copper engraving, printed on paper.
Size (not including margins): 38.5 x 46cm (14.9 x 17.9 inches)
Verso text: German
Condition: Original coloured, excellent.
Condition Rating: A+
References: Taschen, Braun and Hogenberg, p.447.

From: Contrafactur und Beschreibung von den vornembsten Stätten der gantzen Welt, das sechste Buch, 1618. Getruckt zu Cölln, Bey Anthoni Hierath, und Abraham Hogenberg. Im Jahr 1618. (Van der Krogt, 41:2.6)

Braun G. & Hogenberg F. and the Civitates Orbis Terrarum.

The Civitates Orbis Terrarum, or the "Braun & Hogenberg", is a six-volume town atlas and the greatest book of town views and plans ever published: 363 engravings, sometimes beautifully coloured. It was one of the best-selling works in the last quarter of the 16th century. Georg Braun wrote the text accompanying the plans and views on the verso. A large number of the plates were engraved after the original drawings of Joris Hoefnagel (1542-1600), who was a professional artist. The first volume was published in Latin in 1572, the sixth volume in 1617. Frans Hogenberg created the tables for volumes I through IV, and Simon van den Neuwel created those for volumes V and VI. Other contributors were cartographer Daniel Freese, and Heinrich Rantzau. Works by Jacob van Deventer, Sebastian Münster, and Johannes Stumpf were also used. Translations appeared in German and French.

Following the original publication of Volume 1 of the Civitates in 1572, seven further editions of 1575, 1577, 1582, 1588, 1593, 1599 and 1612 can be identified. Vol.2, first issued in 1575, was followed by further editions in 1597 and in 1612. The next volumes appeared in 1581, 1588, 1593, 1599 and 1606. The German translation of the first volume appeared from 1574 on and the French edition from 1575 on.

Several printers were involved: Theodor Graminaeus, Heinrich von Aich, Gottfried von Kempen, Johannis Sinniger, Bertram Buchholtz and Peter von Brachel, who all worked in Cologne.

Georg Braun (1541-1622)

Georg Braun was born in Cologne in 1541. After his studies in Cologne he entered the Jesuit Order as a novice. In 1561 he obtained his bachelor's degree and in 1562 his Magister Artium. Although he left the Jesuit Order, he studied theology, gaining a licentiate in theology.

Frans Hogenberg (1535-1590)

Frans Hogenberg was a Flemish and German painter, engraver, and mapmaker. He was born in Mechelen as the son of Nicolaas Hogenberg.

By the end of the 1560s Frans Hogenberg was employed upon Abraham Ortelius's Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, published in 1570; he is named as engraver on numerous maps. In 1568 he was bannend from Antwerp by the Duke of Alva and travelled to London, where he stayed a few years before emigrating to Cologne. There he immediately embarked on his two most important works, the Civitates published from 1572 and the Geschichtsblätter, which appeared in several series from 1569 until about 1587.

Thanks to such large scale projects as the Geschichtsblätter and the Civitates, Hogenberg's social circumstances improved with each passing year. He died as a wealthy man in Cologne in 1590.